Land of the Liberty Statue

One of the largest and most famous statues in the world rises like a lighthouse beacon at the entrance to New York Harbor. As this time of remembrance about that most tragic day of September 11, 2001, a day that is etched in the minds of the world, it is appropriate to note that our lovely lady Liberty was not destroyed when the twin towers, the pentagon, and the United States took that staggering blow (photo provided). The serene face of the incredible sculpture called Liberty Enlightening the World looks out from Ellis Island as well as from the papers filed and signed by her designer, in the U.S. Patent office January 2, 1870. This is her story.  
Auguste Bartholidi was a young designer when he attended a banquet in Versailles, France and met the famous and enthusiastic Edouard de Laboulaye. Laboulaye was well known for his knowledge of and admiration for the United States. This conversation ultimately led to a long and difficult journey that eventually culminated in our now world famous Statue of Liberty. For the next few columns we will discuss well-known and some little-known facts about this statue that represents so much to so many. We will also bring you the stories of that journey and the artistic genius behind it all.
Born in Colmar, France in April of 1834, Frederic Auguste Bartholdi had three siblings but only he and an oldest brother survived childhood. His family was financially comfortable but moved to Paris to be near the maternal relatives when Bartholdi’s father died and Bartholdi was only two years old. When he grew older he gained a very expansive education which included architecture, painting, drawing lessons, and sculpture studies under respected instructors. In 1853 he received acclaim from a group sculpture he submitted to the Paris Salon and at only twenty years of age his reputation as a sculptor was as strong as the materials with which he worked.  
Bartholdi experienced war and inadequate forms of government. He admired heroism and saw it often as an officer in the Franco-Prussian war. He built many monuments dedicated to the heroism of the French as he had witnessed it often in battle. After the war he had a chance meeting with Laboulaye who had prolific words, documents, and admiration for the United States form of government, particularly the constitution and how it framed and protected a free people. After meeting Edouard de Laboulaye, Bartholdi was inspired and began a long mission to have the French citizenry, not the government, provide this statue to the people of the United States. How this happened, next week.  

  Land of the Liberty Statue Part 2

Auguste Bartholidi was a young designer when he attended a banquet in Versailles, France and met the famous and enthusiastic Edouard de Laboulaye. Laboulaye was well known for his knowledge of and admiration for the United States. This conversation ultimately led to a long and difficult journey that eventually culminated in our now world famous Statue of Liberty. For the next few columns we will discuss well-known and some little-known facts about this statue that represents so much to so many. We will also bring you the stories of that journey and the artistic genius behind it all.
Born in Colmar, France in April of 1834, Frederic Auguste Bartholdi had three siblings but only he and an oldest brother survived childhood. His family was financially comfortable but moved to Paris to be near the maternal relatives when Bartholdi’s father died and Bartholdi was only two years old. When he grew older he gained a very expansive education which included architecture, painting, drawing lessons, and sculpture studies under respected instructors. In 1853 he received acclaim from a group sculpture he submitted to the Paris Salon and at only twenty years of age his reputation as a sculptor was as strong as the materials with which he worked.  
Bartholdi experienced war and inadequate forms of government. He admired heroism and saw it often as an officer in the Franco-Prussian war. He built many monuments dedicated to the heroism of the French as he had witnessed it often in battle. After the war he had a chance meeting with Laboulaye who had prolific words, documents, and admiration for the United States form of government, particularly the constitution and how it framed and protected a free people. After meeting Edouard de Laboulaye, Bartholdi was inspired and began a long mission to have the French citizenry, not the government, provide this statue to the people of the United States. How this happened, next 

STATUE OF LIBERTY SERIES.  Published September, October 2016
               By Darla McCammon

(C) 2016